Swim Seat

swim seat

Baby Towel

baby towel

Overview

Introduction to Michael Phelps Swim Method

Swimming Skills

Core Skills and
Common Stages

Products

Learn to Swim
Instructional Products

History

History of Michael Phelps Swimming

Level 1

Get Wet: Splash

Level 2

Pre-Beginner: Float

Level 3

Beginner: Swim

Level 4

Advanced Beginner: Train


LEVEL ONE – GET WET: SPLASH

Level one is recommended for children no younger than six months but commonly includes children as old as three or four. This level is taught with the parent in the water with the child. Some children are natural-born fish and are fearless and relaxed in the water. Others are nervous and frightened.

The main objective at this level is to get the child comfortable in the water. This is a time for the child and adult to focus on fun in the water to ensure the child has a positive experience with a person they trust.


“If a parent can instill a love of the water in his child
by introducing her to the joy that can be found
in experiencing the properties of water.
– the buoyancy, the bubbles –
then he will be creating a strong
foundation that swimming
skills can be built upon."
- Cathy Bennett


PLAY TO LEARN!

There are things you can do in a pool, and even the bathtub, to support your child at this earliest stage of water introduction.

It’s Raining, It’s Pouring – Have you child lean back in the water (in the tub or the pool), either on her own or with support and, while singing this song, use a watering can or pitcher to pour water gently over her head, first on the back of her head and then allowing a little bit to stream down her face.

Happy and You Know It –Use this song to introduce water play like kicking feet and splashing the water while in the tub. When you move to the pool, you can add blowing bubbles and paddling arms.

I’m a Little Teapot – Holding your child face-to-face, lean to one side to get his ear in water, then to the other side with the other ear when as you sing, “tip me over and pour me out.”

Itsy Bitsy Spider – Using the popular hand motions for this song means your child has to release their hold on you. This can be a great time to use a floatation seat so that you both have free hands. “Wheels on the Bus” is also a great song for this activity.